Changing Your Thinking Will Change Your Weight — Part Two

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In Changing Your Thinking Will Change Your Weight Part One we talked about how the words we use when thinking or talking about weight loss can be powerful agents of motivation. Simply substituting “healthy eating” for “diet” removes negative connotations and helps make us feel more in control of our eating behaviors.

This principle can be applied to developing many habits and attitudes we need to lose weight and keep it off.

Changing the way we think about healthy food is a good example.

I was talking to a woman recently about healthy eating and she mentioned that she had been eating a lot of salads lately. But she didn’t use the word “salad”. She said “rabbit food” and wrinkled her face in disgust.

That’s not the way to build motivation and seize control of eating habits. Clearly, she could find nothing rewarding about eating salads. Referring to salads as “rabbit food” implies it is animal food and unfit for human consumption. Not very encouraging.

Most days I eat sardines right out of the can, but I don’t especially care for sardines. They just aren’t very appetizing. Do I concentrate on all the negative aspects of eating sardines? No. I think about how important it is to include fish in my eating routine.

Fish is high in protein, and that means ounce for ounce it satisfies hunger better than just about anything else. I try to limit eating to mealtimes, so it’s normal for my body to expect food at certain times throughout the day.

After all, you are supposed to feel a little hunger when lunch or dinner rolls around. I look forward to feeling hunger before a mealtime because it is a sign I haven’t been snacking and undermining my weight loss goals. I also look forward to the sensation of feeling full after I eat my sardines.

A lot of this is just reminding ourselves of things we already know.

For example, I remind myself that fish is high in DHA and EPA, two Omega 3 fats proven to have profound effects on metabolizing cholesterol and increasing cognitive functions. For someone like me who has issues with triglycerides and makes a living with my brain these facts are highly motivating.

That little change in perspective – looking forward to the positive nutritional results of a food instead of the immediate sensory satisfaction – makes a huge change in my experience of eating. Instead of thinking only about the sensation of what is in my mouth, my focus changes to healthy eating and the benefits it has for my body and lifestyle.

I apply the same thinking to the sensation of hunger. I can gain weight very easily – it’s a sign of success in long-term weight loss – because my body has become so efficient at digesting what I eat. Notice that I changed “I gain weight very easily” into something positive by paring it with a sign of successful weight loss. Easy weight gain is a sign that I’ve successfully lost weight in the past.

That’s a good thing!

Also, instead of thinking of a hunger pang as a distressing sign that my body is in need of nutrition and is sending out a distress call for immediate feeding I take a different perspective. A hunger pang is a signal that my body is turning from metabolizing energy from sugars and proteins in my bloodstream to metabolizing fat reserves.

That’s a good thing!

It means I’m losing weight, which is exactly what I want to do. Making that simple change in perspective puts me in control of the experiences associated with eating. I feel good about that hunger pang.

I welcome it!

It means that I’m on my way to accomplishing my goal of maintaining my weight and living a healthy lifestyle.

None of this is “looking on the bright side” or searching for a ray of positivity in the gloom. It’s all about applying facts to the experience of weight loss and fighting our human compulsion to make things harder than they really are.

Try it. It will take practice to make it a habit, but that’s true of any skill worth learning.

 

If you liked this article, you may find these interesting also:

 

Can’t Lose Weight? Create a Diet That Works!

How to Ensure a 95% Diet Failure Rate

Why Willpower Is Powerless When It Comes to Dieting

Five ways to use this powerful psychological trick to lose weight

Stop avoiding exercising your mind and body

Forget Health Insurance; Live Healthy and Manage Your Own Healthcare Instead

How I Lost Forty Pounds and Kept It Off and Why You Probably Can’t

How Sleep, Intestines and Microbes Keep Us Fat

Why Physical Exercise Makes You Smarter and Protects Your Brain

Five Things I Learned From the Secret Life of Fat

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